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  1. #21
    Time to work on a temporary mount.







    This way I can sit on it and see how it feels and make any adjustments. And yea it is very comfortable.

    It needs the front cut out so that you can glass the back rest to the base.





    Yea, canít be considered custom until you shed some blood on it.



    After a whole lot more trimming, and some more sizing.
    You are now ready to glass the back rest to the base, need to put supports on to position it.



    And glass it on, this if the first coat on the outside, it will be reinforced from the bottom after it sets.



    And that is where we are at, more later.

  2. #22
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    You are moving along.....

  3. #23
    I want to modify the sides a little, I don’t like these wings on the top edges, on the vinyl one they were part of the seams and the natural shape of the back rest, and it is also what makes the back rest wider than the tour pack so off they go.



    We are stepping up the design a little and the holes are getting larger so time to use a little modeling clay, you can get this at any hobby shop, not that expensive and last forever, very reusable, this stuff is at least ten years old.





    It does not have to be perfect, the sizing will take care of any small imperfections.



    Moving on the front, tying everything together.



    Then need to fill in the arm rest, same thing modeling clay, take you time easy to change now hard to change once it is glass.





    Then glass over that, I am using woven cloth it is easy to work with on areas like this and I don’t want to build it up to much, it will be reinforced from underneath with a couple of layers of mat before I start sizing this area.






    I need to pull out the clay and clean it up before adding the inside layer, the clay has an oil base and so needs to be clean before you glass on any area that it was worked with.
    Next is ton of sizing, sanding so there won’t be a lot of fast changes.

  4. #24
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    You make it look easy.

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Puzzled View Post
    You make it look easy.
    Thanks Puzzled, I have been playing around with glass since I was a kid, it is a fun medium once you get past the itching.
    I spent a bunch of time sanding and making one last change, I told myself that the design work was done, then think of something to change.
    So,,,,,,,,,,,, how about a little tail to change thing just a little?



















    Everything is pretty straight, you sand until it is smooth and straight then fill the low voids and sand again, you can see the areas that have been filled and ready to sand again.
    If you get the glass too thin then you fill it from the inside, you don't need the glass real thick, stock is about 1/8-3/16 or less, on this a quarter of an inch is plenty, more is just extra weight. And since this tour pack is removable and extends back so far any extra weight is unwelcome
    Last edited by HarleyCruiser; 01-26-2018 at 11:55 PM.

  6. #26
    I want to show a few ways to help get your glass straight.



    An easy way to check you contour on a curved area us using a flexible ruler.



    You can see the low areas that need to be filled with glass.

    I want to show you a little trick to get your complex surfaces straight, you make a contoured sand pad.

    Tape it off, glass it and add a handle.



    Pop it off.



    Glue some sand paper on with contact adhesive and sand away.



    And one for the back.





    Don’t forget to put your tape down first or you won’t get if off your work area I have several of these custom pads that I have made over the years, I have one for fenders, it is especially handy to get the right contour. Normally on a fender because of the curve you have a tendency to sand flat spots so these eliminate that.



    And that is where I am, I still have a little sanding to do on the glass, but the majority of the glass work is done, (Thank goodness,) next comes the body work and getting the lid to fit perfect.
    Last edited by HarleyCruiser; 01-27-2018 at 09:39 AM.

  7. #27
    I want a linear actuator to open the door so I need to start planning for that.



    In order to open the lid it takes five pounds of pressure, the smallest most practical 12v actuator will lift ten pounds max, I need a actuator ten inches travel, the overall length of the actuator is the travel plus four inches so fourteen inches.



    To mount it the angle is pretty acute so need to do some more planning.
    So I worked on the glass sizing, for this I am using my belt sander with 50 grit, it takes the glass down pretty fast, them move to a lighter grit. The finish work will be in body filler.
    I had a few last holes nuts to fill.



    Next thing on the list is getting the doors to close and fit right. When you cut the door out there is going to be a gap the size of the blade.
    When I put the door on last time it did not want to close right after being off, one of those things that drive you crazy, you do all that work, then move on and when you go back nothing works the same. Lucky these hinges have adjustments on them. So I moved them around and they close perfect.
    First you need the edge of the door straight. This is a big rasp that I am using to get the lid edge perfect.



    Clean up the lip so they don’t rub.



    We are not worried about the other side of the gap because we are going to fill the gap, in order to do that we mask off the lid so that the filler does not stick, then we mix up some body filler with a little resin and fill the gap.



    You can see the resin makes the filler a little thinner and easy to squeeze into the gap. It also makes the body filler much harder and less likely to break out.

    Then you pull the tape out, and pop the door open.



    I had to use the hole in the front where the speakers go to stick a long rod up and pop the door open.
    And then we are ready to start the body work. This is the same mixture with the resin in the filler.



    The resin makes the filler a little harder to sand, but it also makes the filler so that it matches the same hardness when it comes to sanding. Usually the filler sands out next to the glass and leaves a low spot this way they sand the same.
    I got maybe fifty percent of the body work done, it is very straight, I am not sure of the final finish yet, I am thinking of covering everything with carbon fiber, and there will be a pad on the front.
    I am going to try to get a coat of black gel, guide coat on then start on the mount brackets. I think they are going to be carbon fiber with a plywood, steel core.
    I still haven’t made a decision on that yet.
    Last edited by HarleyCruiser; 01-28-2018 at 10:38 AM.

  8. #28
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    Is the carbon fiber applied similar to the fiberglass?

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Puzzled View Post
    Is the carbon fiber applied similar to the fiberglass?
    Yes, carbon fiber is very cool to work with, you use epoxy instead of resin. I like the west system, I get a gallon of the epoxy then different hardeners (Speed) depending on what I am doing, I also get a filler to thicken it for applications where you want it thick. For the carbon fiber you use a real clear hardener like they use on surf boards.
    Carbon fiber wraps really nice much better than glass, and it is real thin so easy to form, you need to be careful that you do not pull a strand as it will show up if this is your top coat.
    I did my bags several years ago, I like to go over urethane paint, this way you know that your layer is nice and flat, there is not straightening out with CF since it is so thin.
    You rough up your surface, 220, 150, then paint it on with a paint brush, then lay your CF down.





    Cut out your door, before it cures.



    Then you give it several coats of epoxy, sand it then clear coat it with urethane clear.



    This door is ready for clear coat.

    You want to be careful sanding the epoxy, it has a chemical in it amine, that turns white sometimes if the epoxy has not cured enough before sanding, so if you get that you need to let it set then re-sand.
    Only problem with carbon fiber is not many people understand what it is, most think it is a Gucci pattern, then with all the dips and wraps, CF has lost its originality.
    I'm not even sure if I am going to keep the bags in CF, or covering the tour pack, I have been taking a pole of my friends, wife said paint it black, most others just hesitate then say black and chrome, sooooooooo.... might just leave a little for a feature area in the pattern.
    It is great for building parts very light weight and very strong, that is why I like reinforcing my glass with it.
    Last edited by HarleyCruiser; 01-28-2018 at 05:31 PM.

  10. #30
    I was able to get a coat of black gel coat on.





    This is just a guide coat so that you can see your flaws, and lets you know when you have low spot when sanding, it is also a good base for future body work after doing so much glass repair.

    I started on the permanent mounts.



    The sprite box is the shape of the tour pack, and using the temporary mount to get the right height and placement of the pack.
    Trace around the metal base and the bottom of the pack, it is important to keep track where your mount holes are on the bottom of the pack.



    This is the basic shape that I am going for.
    Transfer it to your plywood



    This plywood is a piece of cabinet grade plywood, it has probably eight ten layers ply. It is very stable and strong, will make a good core for the carbon fiber if I decide to do that.
    And then cut it out.







    I am not to worried about being perfect, fast is fine because it will be trimmed more as I see where it needs a diet.
    Plus you always need to remember that this might end up just being a pattern if you don’t like what you see and want to start over.



    And here is what it looks like on the bike.


 

 
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